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Thursday June 20th, 2024

Powerful Order of Buddhist Monks, Christians and Hindus ask for burial of Covid victims

#Stopforcedcremations – Demonstrations against the forced cremations of Muslims who die of Covid have popped up across the North and East

ECONOMYNEXT – One of the country’s biggest Chapter of Buddhist Monks the joint Amarapura-Ramanna sect is asking President Gotabaya Rajapaksa to permit the burial of the remains of Christians and Muslims who die of Covid 19.

This is the first time that a major group of Buddhist Monks have taken a stand to allow burials since the controversy broke in April. A letter sent to the President is also signed by the former Bishop of the Methodist Church Fr Asiri Perera, Fr Jayalath Balagalle from the Roman Catholic Ampitiya Seminary and Kurukukkal P Sivaloganathan of the Sanatana Dharma Research centre.

Signed by the joint Registrars of the Amarapura and Ramanna sects, the letter addressed to the President says the decision to send the appeal to the head of state was made after lengthy discussions with the sect’s Inter-religious Sub-Committee.

The letter noted that the burial of dead bodies is a revered “religious practice including Islam and Christianity” and this right is protected by the Constitution of Sri Lanka.

However, the letter added that this right is subject to restrictions subject to public health.

It said that the decision issued by a gazette notification on April 11 this year making cremation mandatory was taken soon after the outbreak of the pandemic and “we believe it was a precautionary measure taken due to the lack of biological knowledge” about the Covid 19 virus.

The letter went on to say that “now after more than 8 months later, and with a considerable body of research available about the nature of the Covid 19 virus, and results indicating that there is no danger of this virus spreading by the burial of Covid 19 dead bodies, we are of the opinion that there is no justification for the mandatory cremation of those who have died of Covid 19.”

“At this time we take the view that the burials of those who have died due to Covid 19 infection should be allowed subject to certain conditions which would adequately protect the health of the people on one side and the religious practices of the Muslims, Catholics and other religious groups,” the letter asserted.

The letter suggested that the bodies could be buried in concrete or other impervious containers and could be monitored to assure the authorities that it is safe.

The Sects also appealed to the President to convene a meeting of experts to seek advice on the matter.

In a separate statement the Registrar of the Sub-committee Dr Madampagama Assaji Thero, Anunayake of the sect said that this would avoid the government having to face an uncomfortable situation and avoid unnecessary unrest within the Muslim community. (Colombo, December 27, 2020)

Reported by Arjuna Ranawana

The statement can be viewed here in full:

Amarapura-Ramanna statement on burial of Muslim and Christian victims of Covid

Comments (7)

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  1. Upali Weerasinghe says:

    I would like to respect Mahayana for timely decision to protect Sri Lankan’s and their cultural interests

  2. Good Sinhalese says:

    A good reason for lifting the ban is provided, maybe sometimes well organized to get rid of the situation, created by chauvinists. Better the government deal with this request rather than to ask for Malwathu and Asgiri Chapters’ permission than to face the music in Geneva in March, and to antagonize the Muslim Countries who had been generally friendly with us.

  3. Gos says:

    As usual, the rightwing opposition politicians have stirred up a right royal stir-up to gain the advantage of minority votes ably helped by extremist funds to create an image to the international bigwigs who will not hesitate to take up their favourite weapon of Human Rights to threaten the Sri Lankan govt. It’s disgusting how dirty politics become the weapon to beat a govt who have so far allowed Health specialists to rule over COVID-19 pandemic threat who decreed that all corpses contaminated with the virus should be cremated. Cremation has affected the loved ones of all religions Buddhists, Christians and Muslims alike but the minority Muslims make the biggest noise despite the danger envisaged by burials. Shame on you

  4. Gamini says:

    Keep things simple guys… follow the guidelines of the WHO, put this issue behind, and concentrate on more pressing issues. We have wasted enough time.

  5. Eric says:

    Patients who die of corona get buried all over the world and I don’t understand the reason in Sri Lanka for this issue drags so long. If some religious group wants to bury their members of same faith the government by now should have come up with a solution . The government can assist these community by providing burial grounds in very dry part of the country away from populated area so that no way any infection can be contaminated with underground water .

  6. Tilak Dewa says:

    Simple issue easily would have easily resolved by sealing the bodies in proper materials before burial. Now it has become a conflict between two communities. It should end immediately or there will be a disaster again. Similar thing happened due to language issue and who paid for that mistake?

  7. Kuruwitage Silva says:

    These Buddhist Monks canvassing for Muslim Burial are paid heavily by Muslim business owners.

View all comments (7)

Comments (7)

Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

  1. Upali Weerasinghe says:

    I would like to respect Mahayana for timely decision to protect Sri Lankan’s and their cultural interests

  2. Good Sinhalese says:

    A good reason for lifting the ban is provided, maybe sometimes well organized to get rid of the situation, created by chauvinists. Better the government deal with this request rather than to ask for Malwathu and Asgiri Chapters’ permission than to face the music in Geneva in March, and to antagonize the Muslim Countries who had been generally friendly with us.

  3. Gos says:

    As usual, the rightwing opposition politicians have stirred up a right royal stir-up to gain the advantage of minority votes ably helped by extremist funds to create an image to the international bigwigs who will not hesitate to take up their favourite weapon of Human Rights to threaten the Sri Lankan govt. It’s disgusting how dirty politics become the weapon to beat a govt who have so far allowed Health specialists to rule over COVID-19 pandemic threat who decreed that all corpses contaminated with the virus should be cremated. Cremation has affected the loved ones of all religions Buddhists, Christians and Muslims alike but the minority Muslims make the biggest noise despite the danger envisaged by burials. Shame on you

  4. Gamini says:

    Keep things simple guys… follow the guidelines of the WHO, put this issue behind, and concentrate on more pressing issues. We have wasted enough time.

  5. Eric says:

    Patients who die of corona get buried all over the world and I don’t understand the reason in Sri Lanka for this issue drags so long. If some religious group wants to bury their members of same faith the government by now should have come up with a solution . The government can assist these community by providing burial grounds in very dry part of the country away from populated area so that no way any infection can be contaminated with underground water .

  6. Tilak Dewa says:

    Simple issue easily would have easily resolved by sealing the bodies in proper materials before burial. Now it has become a conflict between two communities. It should end immediately or there will be a disaster again. Similar thing happened due to language issue and who paid for that mistake?

  7. Kuruwitage Silva says:

    These Buddhist Monks canvassing for Muslim Burial are paid heavily by Muslim business owners.

Sri Lanka shares debt management experience at global forum

ECONOMYNEXT – Sri Lanka has shared its experiences at a forum on debt management to “provide lessons for others”, State Minister of Finance Shehan Semasinghe has said.

Semasinghe spoke on “The Role of Debt Management in Navigating Crises” at the 14th Debt Management Facility (DMF) Stakeholders’ Forum, in Livingstone, Zambia.

“I shared the experiences of Sri Lanka which can provide valuable lessons for others and explored the critical elements of capacity building and sound institutional practices in managing debt, particularly in the context of economic challenges,” Semasinghe said on X (twitter).

“Sri Lanka’s experience demonstrates that effective debt management is not just about managing numbers but also about building robust institutions and capacities.”

The journey underscores the importance of transparent, accountable governance and the need for international support and cooperation in times of crisis, he said.

“Sri Lanka prioritized addressing gaps in public debt management by drafting a consolidated Public Debt Management Act, ensuring clarity and legal robustness and establishing a centralized Public Debt Management Office with operational autonomy.

“The role of debt management in navigating crises is multifaceted and critical. Further, by investing in capacity building, adhering to sound institutional practices, and strategically managing debt restructuring and liability operations, countries can better withstand economic shocks and pave the way for sustainable recovery.”

Developing countries face severe debt distress as they are more vulnerable to external shocks, Semasinghe said, and “managing global debt requires coordinated international efforts on debt restructuring where necessary, timely fiscal policy adaptation and help sustainable economic growth.”

The state minister also pointed out the financial impact of climate change was an emerging challenge, as countries need investment to mitigate and adapt to climate impacts, “especially through non-debt creating inflows, which would require private capital mobilization.” (Colombo/Jun20/2024)

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Sri Lanka rupee closes stronger at 305.10/30 to US dollar

ECONOMYNEXT – Sri Lanka’s rupee closed stronger ahead of the long weekend at 305.10/30 to the US dollar on Thursday, up from 305.40/55 to the US dollar Wednesday, dealers said, while some bond yields edged up.

A bond maturing on 15.12.2026 closed at 10.45/80 percent, up from 10.35/75 percent.

A bond maturing on 01.07.2028 closed at 11.20/45 percent.

A bond maturing on 15.09.2029 closed at 12.00/15 percent, up from 11.95/12.35 percent.

A bond maturing on 01.12.2031 closed at 12.05/25 percent.
(Colombo/Jun20/2024)

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Sri Lanka stocks close up, JKH trade pushes turnover

ECONOMYNEXT – The Colombo Stock Exchange closed up on Thursday, data on its site showed.

The broader All Share Index closed up 0.19 percent, or 23.11 points, at 12,249; while the more liquid S&P SL20 Index closed up 0.15 percent, or 5.33 points, at 3,610.

Turnover was 2 billion. Nearly half of this (Rs980mn) came from a crossing on John Keells Holdings Plc. The share closed down at 202.00.

“There were several crossings today which pushed turnover,” market participants said.

“Institutions and high net-worth activity drove the market, while the retail investors we feel are still about uncertain and adopting a wait-and-see approach.”

Melstacorp Plc was among the companies that saw active volumes (Rs194mn) in the day. The share closed up at 87.10.

Top contributors to the index included TeeJay Lanka Plc (up at 41.70), Sampath Bank Plc (up at 79.50), Hatton National Bank Plc (down at 201.00). Hayleys Plc (up at 105.00) and its subsidiary Hayleys Fabric Plc (up at 46.60) were also positive contributors. (Colombo/Jun20/2024)

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