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Thursday June 20th, 2024

Sri Lanka’s JVP will not support sustained strike beyond Mar 15: Lal Kantha

ECONOMYNEXT – Sri Lanka’s leftist opposition party the Janatha Vimukthi Peramuna (JVP) supports the strikes planned for March 15 against IMF-backed progressive taxation but is not in favour of a sustained strike at this stage, JVP frontliner K D Lal Kantha said.

Speaking at an event in Colombo yesterday, the former parliamentarian said unions should consider the government’s response or lack thereof to the March 15 campaign and then take a call on continued trade union action.

Lal Kantha was speaking at event organised by a collective of trade unions and professional associations demanding a reversal of the government’s International Monetary Fund (IMF) backed progressive tax regime.

Opposition MPs Tissa Attanayake, G L Peiris, Udaya Gammanpila, Buddhika Pathirana and Channa Jayasumana were also seen at the event.

“At this moment, we fully support the strike on March 15. We’re already working towards that. But at this stage, we do not agree with the plans for a continuous strike,” said Lal Kantha.

“Our position is that it would be more prudent to take further trade union action once the programme for the 15th is successfully completed and upon evaluation of the government’s response or lack thereof to that,” he said.

Trade unions in Sri Lanka have threatened to cripple the economy if the government does not reverse a number of IMF-backed reforms including the personal income tax hike, with one main opposition SJB-affiliated union leader promising a total shutdown of power & energy, medical, banking and other vital sectors starting midnight March 14.

Samagi Trade Union Collective Convenor Ananda Palitha told reporters on Monday March 13 that if the government does not revoke a newly increased progressive tax regime, lower interest rates and reverse a steep electricity tariff hike, trade unions will decide the fate of the government.

Related:

Sri Lanka unions threaten to cripple economy against IMF-backed reforms

High-income earning public servants in higher education, medical, banking, ports and other sectors have for weeks been threatening to up the ante in ongoing trade union action against Sri Lanka’s IMF-backed reforms, including a progressive income tax hike that sees the cash-strapped government collect from anyone earning over 100,000 rupees a month.

Minister of Ports, Shipping and Aviation Nimal Siripala de Silva told parliament on Thursday that 17 ships en route to the Colombo Port had turned back as a result of a recent anti-tax protest organised by port unions. He also claimed that one protesting port worker earns over 170,000 rupees a month.

Sri Lanka’s new tax regime has both its defenders and detractors. Critics who are opposed to progressive taxation said it serves as a disincentive to industry and capital which can be invested in business. They argue that a flat rate of taxation is implemented where everyone is taxed at the same rate.

Others, however, contend that the new taxes only affect some 10-12 percent of the population and, given the country’s economic situation, is necessary, if not vital.

Critics of the protesting workers argue that most of the workers earn high salaries that most ordinary people can only dream of, and though there may be some cases where breadwinners could be taxed more equitably, overall, Sri Lanka’s tax rates remain low and are not unfair. (Colombo/Mar14/2023)

 

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  1. dinesh says:

    This is false. He said, at this stage they not support sustained strike.

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  1. dinesh says:

    This is false. He said, at this stage they not support sustained strike.

Sri Lanka shares debt management experience at global forum

ECONOMYNEXT – Sri Lanka has shared its experiences at a forum on debt management to “provide lessons for others”, State Minister of Finance Shehan Semasinghe has said.

Semasinghe spoke on “The Role of Debt Management in Navigating Crises” at the 14th Debt Management Facility (DMF) Stakeholders’ Forum, in Livingstone, Zambia.

“I shared the experiences of Sri Lanka which can provide valuable lessons for others and explored the critical elements of capacity building and sound institutional practices in managing debt, particularly in the context of economic challenges,” Semasinghe said on X (twitter).

“Sri Lanka’s experience demonstrates that effective debt management is not just about managing numbers but also about building robust institutions and capacities.”

The journey underscores the importance of transparent, accountable governance and the need for international support and cooperation in times of crisis, he said.

“Sri Lanka prioritized addressing gaps in public debt management by drafting a consolidated Public Debt Management Act, ensuring clarity and legal robustness and establishing a centralized Public Debt Management Office with operational autonomy.

“The role of debt management in navigating crises is multifaceted and critical. Further, by investing in capacity building, adhering to sound institutional practices, and strategically managing debt restructuring and liability operations, countries can better withstand economic shocks and pave the way for sustainable recovery.”

Developing countries face severe debt distress as they are more vulnerable to external shocks, Semasinghe said, and “managing global debt requires coordinated international efforts on debt restructuring where necessary, timely fiscal policy adaptation and help sustainable economic growth.”

The state minister also pointed out the financial impact of climate change was an emerging challenge, as countries need investment to mitigate and adapt to climate impacts, “especially through non-debt creating inflows, which would require private capital mobilization.” (Colombo/Jun20/2024)

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Sri Lanka rupee closes stronger at 305.10/30 to US dollar

ECONOMYNEXT – Sri Lanka’s rupee closed stronger ahead of the long weekend at 305.10/30 to the US dollar on Thursday, up from 305.40/55 to the US dollar Wednesday, dealers said, while some bond yields edged up.

A bond maturing on 15.12.2026 closed at 10.45/80 percent, up from 10.35/75 percent.

A bond maturing on 01.07.2028 closed at 11.20/45 percent.

A bond maturing on 15.09.2029 closed at 12.00/15 percent, up from 11.95/12.35 percent.

A bond maturing on 01.12.2031 closed at 12.05/25 percent.
(Colombo/Jun20/2024)

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Sri Lanka stocks close up, JKH trade pushes turnover

ECONOMYNEXT – The Colombo Stock Exchange closed up on Thursday, data on its site showed.

The broader All Share Index closed up 0.19 percent, or 23.11 points, at 12,249; while the more liquid S&P SL20 Index closed up 0.15 percent, or 5.33 points, at 3,610.

Turnover was 2 billion. Nearly half of this (Rs980mn) came from a crossing on John Keells Holdings Plc. The share closed down at 202.00.

“There were several crossings today which pushed turnover,” market participants said.

“Institutions and high net-worth activity drove the market, while the retail investors we feel are still about uncertain and adopting a wait-and-see approach.”

Melstacorp Plc was among the companies that saw active volumes (Rs194mn) in the day. The share closed up at 87.10.

Top contributors to the index included TeeJay Lanka Plc (up at 41.70), Sampath Bank Plc (up at 79.50), Hatton National Bank Plc (down at 201.00). Hayleys Plc (up at 105.00) and its subsidiary Hayleys Fabric Plc (up at 46.60) were also positive contributors. (Colombo/Jun20/2024)

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